Comics and Comic Strips

A collection of comics and comic strips related to Korean history

The goal of this project is to visually recreate the stories in the form of a comic strip from Jisoo Kim’s research in Chapter Five of her book the Emotions of Justice. Throughout this chapter, Kim includes stories of individuals who petitioned on behalf of their family members to highlight the way…
View Entry | Show on Map

These panels are an interpretation of the life of Yi Pinghogak (1759-1824). She was the author of one of the first extant cookbooks in Korea, contributing to women’s literacy and expanding women’s role in society. The influence of Yi’s family and upbringing will be discussed as a significant…
View Entry | Show on Map

This comic provides a visual representation of the relationship between Jeong Do-Jeon and Yi Songgye based on the evidence offered by David M. Robinson in his introduction to his translation ofSeeking Order in a Tumultuous Age: The Writings of Chŏng Tojŏn, a Neo-Confucian, and the subsequent chapters that zoom in on Jeong Do-Jeon's text. From this context, it focuses on three instances spanning…
View Entry | Show on Map

I wanted this comic to let people know how the Korean alphabet was invented by King Sejong (May 7th, 1397--March 30th, 1450), the 4th King of Choson Dynasty. According to Gari Ledyard, King Sejong invented the alphabet to make the texts more accessible to more people including the students, the teachers, the peasants, and more. I will share the brief process of the invention through this project.
View Entry | Show on Map

I created a comic strip on the history of soju because this topic had truly piqued my interest. The comic strip highlights information drawn from the book Soju: A Global History (Cambridge University Press, 2021) by Hyunhee Park. While it was definitely a challenge to condense the vast amount of information in the book, I aimed to convey the main takeaways. One of the key takeaways is how soju…
View Entry | Show on Map

The Diary of 1636 is a collection of the translated diary entries of Na Man’gap during the Manchu invasion of the same year. Through the translations by George Kallander, we are introduced to Na Man'gap. Na was a scholar who most notably wrote about the Chosŏn war against the Manchu in 1636. His first-person account was in the form of a diary where he chronicled the war and the events around him.…
View Entry | Show on Map